Patrons and clients in Mediterranean societies

Cover of: Patrons and clients in Mediterranean societies |

Published by Duckworth, Center for Mediterranean Studies of the American Universities Field Staff in London, Hanover, N.H .

Written in English

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Places:

  • Mediterranean Region,
  • Mediterranean Region.

Subjects:

  • Patronage, Political.,
  • Patronage, Political -- Mediterranean Region.,
  • Mediterranean Region -- Politics and government.

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographies and indexes.

Book details

Statementedited by Ernest Gellner and John Waterbury.
ContributionsGellner, Ernest., Waterbury, John.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsJF274 .P37 1977
The Physical Object
Paginationxi, 348 p. ;
Number of Pages348
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL4538515M
ISBN 100910116997
LC Control Number77004726

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Patrons and Clients in Mediterranean Societies. Ernest Gellner, John Waterbury. Duckworth, - Mediterranean Region Patrons and Clients in Mediterranean Societies Identity and Politics, Plough, Sword, and Book", and "Conditions of Liberty.

Bibliographic information. Title: Patrons and Clients in Mediterranean Societies: Editors. Patrons and clients in Mediterranean societies by Ernest Gellner, John Waterbury,Duckworth, Center for Mediterranean Studies of the American Universities Field Staff edition, in EnglishPages: Patrons and clients in Mediterranean societies Hardcover – January 1, by Ernest Gellner (Editor), John Waterbury (Editor) out of 5 stars 1 rating5/5(1).

Patrons and clients in Mediterranean societies. London: Duckworth ; Hanover, N.H.: Center for Mediterranean Studies of the American Universities Field Staff, (OCoLC) Patrons and clients in Mediterranean societies / edited by Ernest Gellner and John Waterbury Duckworth ; Center for Mediterranean Studies of the American Universities Field Staff London: Hanover, N.H Australian/Harvard Citation.

Gellner, Ernest. & Waterbury, John. “When the saints go marching out: Reflections on the decline of patronage in Malta,” in Patrons and clients in Mediterranean societies, ed.

Gellner, Ernest and Waterbury, John. London: Duckworth. This book analyses some special types of these interpersonal relations - ritual kinship, patron-client relations and friendship - and the social conditions in which they develop.

The authors draw upon a wide range of examples, from societies as diverse as these of the Mediterranean, Latin America, the Middle and Far East and the U.S.S.R., in. Patrons Clients and Friends.

Overall, this excellent book powerfully demonstrates the need for scholars to go beyond attention to election processes when evaluating what village democracy means in a Chinese context. It is a must-read for all serious scholars of Chinese politics and society. —Rachel Murphy, University of Oxford Guohui Wang.

The work of art or book would be dedicated to the patron. Outcomes of the Patronage System. The idea of client/patron relationships had significant implications for the later Roman Empire and even medieval society. As Rome expanded throughout the Republic and Empire, it took over smaller states which had its own customs and rules of law.

A Conceptual Framework for the Study of Clientelism; and the contributions to the Conference on Patronage held Nov. in Rome by the Center for Mediterranean Studies of the American Universities Field Staff and included in Gellner, E.

and Waterbury, J., Patrons and Clients, esp. Gellner, E., ‘Patrons and Clients,” 1 – 6. Find helpful customer reviews and review ratings for Patrons and clients in Mediterranean societies at Read honest and unbiased product reviews from our users.5/5.

6 E. Gellner, “Patrons and Clients,” in Patrons and Clients in Mediterranean Societies (ed. Gellner and J. Waterbury; London: Duckworth, ), ; S. Eisenstadt and L.

Roniger, “Patron-Client Relations as a Model of Structuring Social Exchange,” Comparative Studies. the client was more dependent on the patron than vice versa, while the verticality was due to the palpable social gap between patr on and client, i.e., the latter belonged to a lower social class.

In this chapter Malina reemphasizes his claim from chapter 1, that the kingdom of God refers to a new patron-client system, with God as patron. Although not really relevant to the broader discussion, especially interesting in this chapter is the discussion of face-to-mace (feudal) societies, where the use of a "truth" language (e.g., Latin in.

Patrons, Clients and Friends: Interpersonal Relations and the Structure of Trust in Society (Themes in the Social Sciences) | Eisenstadt, S. N., Roniger, Luis | ISBN: | Kostenloser Versand für alle Bücher mit Versand und Verkauf duch Amazon.

Buy Patrons, Clients and Friends: Interpersonal Relations and the Structure of Trust in Society (Themes in the Social Sciences) by S.N. Eisenstadt, Luis Roniger, Jack Goody, Geoffrey Hawthorn, John Dunn (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on. The system of the client-patron relationship did not die with Rome, instead forms of it transferred to medieval societies in the 10 th century AD.

Patronage in society played a major part in the lives of Romans whether they were the patrons or the clients. One of several worthwhile works by this pair of scholars, this collaborative book established the socializing aspect that is the foundation of patronage.

Gellner, E., and J. Waterbury, eds. Patrons and Clients in Mediterranean Society. London: Gerald Duckworth, E-mail Citation». Patronage (clientela) was the distinctive relationship in ancient Roman society between the patronus ("patron") and their cliens ("client").

The relationship was hierarchical, but obligations were mutual. The patron was the protector, sponsor, and benefactor of the client; the technical term for this protection was patrocinium. Although typically the client was of inferior social class, a. Patrons and Clients in Mediterranean Societies, co-edited with John Waterbury, (Duckworth, ).

Liberalism in Modern Times: Essays in Honour of Jose G. Merquior, co-edited with Cesar Cansino, (Central European University Press, ). Sacrificial gift-giving sustained the patron-client relations that denizens of the Mediterranean supposed they had with their superiors—ancestors and god(s).

This book, a collection of. Economic anthropology of mediterranean societies. Stratification. Maghreb marry Marx mediterranean Morocco mrabtin Nisiots nuclear family Orasac organisation parallel cousin patrilineal patronage patrons peasants perhaps Peters Peters's Pisticci Pitt-Rivers political population prestige reader recognised About Google Books.

In other words, patronage in these societies is a major principle of social organization - both conceptually and insti­ tutionally. So apparent' was this of the Mediterranean that Davis in his book PeopZe of the Mediterranean was forced to conclude that 'patronage is the bedrock of political life in most of those Medi­.

ETHNIC, POLITICAL, SOCIOLOGICAL AND ANTHROPOLOGICAL STUDIES: Attalides, Michael. "Forms of peasant incorporation in Cyprus during the last century.". The form of social relations described by the terms 'patronage' and 'patron-client relations' is of central concern to sociologists, anthropologists and political scientists today.

Characterised by its voluntary and highly personal but often fully institutionalised nature, it is a type of behaviour found in almost every human society/5(6).

Social Hierarchy, Patron-Client Relationships and Power. Radical social change has engulfed Cambodia in the 20 th century, but there are some important normative ideas about social relationships, power and morality from pre-modern, pre-revolutionary society that remain relevant for our understanding of contemporary culture and politics.

This essay discusses hierarchy, leadership and patron. Patrons, Clients, and Empire: Chieftaincy and Over-rule in Asia, Africa, and the Pacific Colin Newbury This is a wide-ranging comparative study of relationships between the indigenous leadership of traditional states and colonizing Europeans from the seventeenth to the twentieth century.

Patrons and Clients 1. Introduction greater relevance and understanding to societies with a very different comprehension of life and the world.

Its starting point is the recognition of the gulf that separates twenty-first ethnocentric and anachronistic readings and of providing insights into Mediterranean culture is acknowledged, though.

The Mediterranean countries have long attracted the attention of social anthropologists, from Frazer and Durkheim to the present day. In this volume, first published inDr Davis reviews the extensive anthropological material collected and published by people who have worked in the area and claims that social anthropologists have a distinctive opportunity to compare similar kinds of.

As Gellner () has pointed out, patron-clientelism thrives in contexts of transition in which the state, unable to emancipate itself from society, is penetrated by an ever widening, complex, and centralizing series of patron-client networks whose particularistic logic co-exists with and often predominates over the more universalist logic.

Access to society journal content varies across our titles. If you have access to a journal via a society or association membership, please browse to your society journal, select an article to view, and follow the instructions in this box. Waterbury, eds., Patrons and Clients in Mediterranean Societies (London, ).

I have used these definitions in my book, Patrons, Brokers, and Clients in Seventeenth-Century France (Oxford, ). PATRONAGE DURING THE FRONDE successful client to have had several patrons.

Patrons and clients in Mediterranean societies. London: Duckworth in association with Centre for Mediterranean Studies of the American Universities Field Staff. London: Duckworth in association with Centre for Mediterranean Studies of the American Universities Field Staff.

these people were a somewhat ambiguous class in Mediterranean society; they were treated better than in other areas and were needed to conduct trade slavery this was common in both Greek and Roman societies, with key philosophers providing elaborate justifications for it; people under this system were used in silver mines, agriculture, and city.

Sacrificial gift-giving sustained the patron-client relations that denizens of the Mediterranean supposed they had with their superiors—ancestors and god(s). It did so by serving as a gesture of gratitude to one's patrons; it was the primary means of honoring them.

North Charles Street Baltimore, Maryland, USA +1 () [email protected] © Project MUSE. Produced by Johns Hopkins University. patron-client relationship The roots of the patron-client relationship have been traced by some to the dependence of plebians on patricians in the Roman r the relationship is perhaps more obvious in the system of servitude known as serfdom that was widespread in Europe in the Middle various systems of tenancy that followed the fall of the ancient societies of Greece and.

With good reason, anthropologists of Mediterranean societies were revealing that, aside from few exceptions (White, ), patronage coalitions permeated in particular the political systems of the societies studied (Signorelli, ).

Consequently, personalized patron/client relationships were typical between political entrepreneurs and electors. available for assistance in the future, the client doing everything in his or her power to enhance the fame and honor of the patron (publicizing the benefit and showing the patron respect), remaining loyal to the patron, and providing services whenever the opportunity arose.

Sometimes the most important gift a patron could give was access to. Since the Bible is a Mediterranean document written for Mediterranean readers, it presumes the cultural resources and worldview available to a reader socialized in the Mediterranean world.

This means that for all non-Mediterraneans, including all Americans, reading the. the reciprocity model requires "you to love your patrons, clients, kinsmen, and friends, but not all members of your nation," while the solidarity model requires "you to love all members of your nation whether or not they are personally con nected to you" (15).

In contrast to other Mediterranean societies. Alliances and patron-client relationships have helped support states since the beginning of social complexity.

In a recent Christian Science Monitor article, Seshat contributor and Santa Fe Institute external professor Paula Sabloff analyzed equal alliances and patron-client f’s research was part of a John Templeton Foundation-funded project at the Santa .A tabula patronatus from Bocchorus (AD 6).

Patronage (clientela) was the distinctive relationship in ancient Roman society between the patronus ("patron") and their cliens ("client").

The relationship was hierarchical, but obligations were mutual. The patron was the protector, sponsor, and benefactor of the client; the technical term for this protection was patrocinium. [1].

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